Bolt Action: Building & Painting Guide of Vasily Zaitsev, By Warlord Games

Following on from my review of the brand new Stalingrad Campaign book for Bolt Action by Warlord Games, why not showcase a little painting guide of the beautifully sculpted Vasily Zaitsev model for your Soviet Union army.

As mentioned previously, I already have a Soviet Union army, but with the new recent release of the stunning new campaign book, I’m able to revisit and build a new army to suit my playing style. To begin with, I simply filed down and removed any access metal, smoothed out the base and glued the model in place with some super glue.

undefined

Basing:

Now, this is very much a personal taste thing, but the big metal chunk when stuck down brings a level difference to the base. To counter this and to make things seem a little more natural once sand is added, I simple cut up and applied some green stuff to the base. This doesn’t have to look anything special as the base s going to be covered in sand, but what this will do is to remove the level difference giving a more natural flat base to apply sand too.

undefined undefined

The next thing to do was to grab any extra basing supplies I wanted to use. As I wanted to build out a new Stalingrad army, I simply had to have a rubble basing style so attaching some bricks to represent destroyed buildings / walls etc was a go to. Having a quick look on eBay, you can grab yourself some 28mm bricks for wargaming basing.

undefined

Finally, to finish off the basing process before painting was to add in everything I wanted on the base. The bricks I’ve used are resin, so super gluing a few of those down to the base first was next. I always tend to do my character models with a little more extra basing then most, as you want them to stand out on the table top. I placed four bricks down, with a couple over lapping on the back. The reason I added the bricks first, was so when I came to applying PVA glue afterwards, I could slightly cover some to the bricks, making it look like mud and rubble has settled on top either from the blasts of near by bombs or falling buildings.

undefined undefined

Base Paint Colours:

When painting any miniatures, applying a base coat to your miniature is always a great starting point. Normally, I like base coating my miniatures in darker tones, such as Chaos Black or Grey Seer spray, as I have always painted from black up. However, I don’t own any sprays at the moment and I live in a small tiny flat, so other paints would be my friend. After seeing for myself how well the Corax White Base Paint worked on my Theoden King Of Rohan Model for Middle-Earth Battle Games, I was confident that this would once again give me a really good base coverage and starting point to work from. Using a 50/50 mix of Corax White Base Paint and water, I applied two thin coats to get the most coverage, making sure the first coat was completely dry.

undefined

Next up was to do the large areas of the mode, the uniform and the cape. I chose to do the uniform. One of the other reasons I also wanted to using a white base primer was due to Contrast Paints. Soviet Union troops had a sorta of beige/khaki/yellow uniform, and to represent that, I found an almost perfect colour in my eyes called Aggros Dunes. This contrast paint was super easy to apply over a single coat, just pay close and careful attention to not letting the paint build up in areas, but rather you want to spread it around getting that even coverage like below

undefined

Second large area was Vasily’s cape. As I wanted to try and get a close match to the films, I searched for a few stills of Vasily from the film ‘Enemy At The Gates’ and noticed that his cape was a sorta blend between greys and greens. So with that in mind, I started the cape by applying a full coverage of Skavenblight Dinge as this grey would be enough to give me that foundation colour I wanted for an overall grey cape, but would also let me add some green’s if I wanted. I repeated this same process for the cloth that you can see wrapped around Vasily’s sniper rifle.

undefined

After finishing up the cape, the next thing was to do any boot, straps, guns etc. To do this, I used Dryad Bark as this would give me that overall dark brown colour I wanted which I could then highlight up to suit. Again, looking at a few reference pictures, I saw that Vasily’s sniper rifle, the main body of it was wood, so Dryad Bark gave me the perfect solution.

undefined

Once the boots, guns and straps where done, the next biggish area was skin. to start off I used Bugmans Glow. When apply skin, I find it best to water down the base tone your using, in my case, Bugmans Glow, and let it fully dry. Once it has, apply enough coat and continue to do this until you have a nice even coverage where you can see all of the facial details. See below.

undefined

Letting the flesh colour dry fully, I applied a base layer of Ungor Flesh to the hats. This would be the base layer for the hat fluf instead. As this model features these being tied up on the top, I wanted to let them stand out a little buy giving them a lighter colour. This would (or should) help to show off the flesh colour a bit more as this is a focal point on the miniature.

undefined undefined

The final base layer was the metal. This model doest actually have a lot of metal to paint, the only real visible metal is on parts of the gun. I used Lead Belcher to do this as this would give me a cleaner and bright metal colour before applying a wash.

After that, The next step was that of a simple one, wash the model. Now, as Stalingrad was a ruined city and people where living in some of the most hard conditions in WW2, I wanted everything to look and feel dirty to represent their hardship. Agrax Earth Shade was perfect for the job. This applied everything to blend together a bit more whilst bringing down and giving that overall look and feel I wanted. I applied this over the entire model, just not the skin as the skin I was still working on.

undefined undefined

Highlights:

Ushabti Bone was next, this light bone colour allowed me to dry brush the hat fluff, giving me that look of soft wool that I was going for.

Dawnstone
I next used Dawnstone to use as a trim for the cape and to lightly dry brush over the entire cape and cloth covering the gun. This lighter grey colour would nicely give me the depth I wanted between the two greys allowing the sculpt of the model to stand out a little more to my liking.

undefined undefined

The final highlight was working on the skin tone. Cadian Fleshtone was next up. Using a 50/50 mix of Bugmans Glow & Cadian Fleshtone, I applied a thin layer over all skin area and once fully dry I then applied a single coverage of just Cadian Fleshtone but only focusing more on the raised areas of the flesh, cheeks, forehead, fingers, chin etc

undefined

Finally, to give the skin a little extra lift and highlight, I applied Kislev Flesh to only the most extreme raised areas of the skin. By applied a light coverage in this way, you’re able to add an extra level of detail to the flesh as well as helping the facial features to pop slightly more by being that extra bit noticeable. See below for the finished flesh work.

undefined

Basing:

When it came to the basing, I knew from the start that I wanted to have a rubble / mud / fallen brick theme throughout my army to represent the bombed out city of Stalingrad. To start with, I applied a water down mix of Abandon Black over the whole base. Letting that dry fully took sometime, but once It has, I was then able to go over the black and apply Dryad Bark over the sand. This gave me a great starting point for the rubble / mud look I was looking for.

undefined

When that was fully dry, I was then able to drybursh a helping of Mourn Fang Brown over the rubble areas. This would help lift the and give added texture I wanted. It was also going to help blend in the lighter brick colour which was next. As the colour I was going to use for the bricks was a contrast colour, this meant that I would have to go back through and very carefully re-apply Corax White Base Paint to the bricks. Not a hard tasks by any means, just be careful to not go over your basing work.

undefined

Once you had something that looked like above, I was then able to apply Gryph-Hound Orange on each brick. Again, when working with contrast paint, I find its best to apply and even coverage and to not let it build up and puddle. As I only had 4 bricks to paint, I really didn’t need to apply much to get the nice overall coverage I was looking for. Finally, just to neaten the base of I went around the rim and applied a thin coat of Abandon Black just to neaten things off.

undefined undefined

And with that, my finished Vasily was complete… Or so I thought. When looking at the model, I wasn’t overly happy with the uniform being a single colour. So to fix this, I wanted to break things up by using a darker green colour. The leg part of the uniform and some of the straps over the barrel of the gun would give me that break up in colour I needed. Castellan Green gave me the colour I was looking for as the base colour. I then simply mixed in a little Corax White Base Paint to let me highlight certain areas.

Finally the very last thing to do was to paint the star on the hat red with Khorne Red, and with that, my version of Vasily Zaitsev was complete.



undefined

Thanks for reading!

If you like anything you’ve read in this painting guide, I’ve thrown together all the links you need to follow this painting guide step-by-step below. Check it out for yourself!

Links For Paints Used:
1) Corax White Base Paint
2) Aggros Dunes
3) Skavenblight Dinge
4) Dryad Bark
5) Bugmans Glow
6) Ungor Flesh
7) Lead Belcher
8) Agrax Earth Shade
9) Ushabti Bone
10) Dawnstone
11) Cadian Fleshtone
12) Kislev Flesh
13) Abandon Black
14) Dryad Bark
15) Mourning Brown
16) Gryph-Hound Orange
17) Castellan Green
18) Khorne Red




Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.