Age Of Sigmar: Building and Painting Guide for Chainrasp Horde.

As I decided on collecting Nighthaunt for Age Of Sigmar, the single 10 sprue of Chainrasp Horde from Issue One of Mortal Realms, gave me the perfect starting point when It came to building my new army for a new game system.

The Chainrasps also presented my with a really good opportunity to look into a wider painting methods that suited my style of painting and the overall army aesthetic and theme I was looking to achieve. As well as that, it allowed me the time and flexibility to think of and work in and idea of how I wanted to base my miniatures. By working these two things out nice and early in the process, any remaining units and characters I add in will / should be quicker to complete. Well, that’s the idea anyway!

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To begin:
I grabbed all the bases and a the blue plastic sprue from issue one, opened up the magazine to building guide section and began to prep. I also grabbed my hobby files and clippers to help clip the plastics from the sprue and to file down any little excess plastic not needed on the finished miniature.

What I found, was that was a really nice touch, is the numbered building instruction guide that’s included in the magazine. This helps you to navigate far more easily when clipping each part of the sprue when putting each part together.

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Following the step by set guide in the magazine, you’re able to build 10 Chainrasps, one of which is the Dread Warden, who acts as the leader of the unit. Very little components are used to create these models which make the assembly prices very easy. Although as each component is so detailed and very thin, un-clipping them from the sprue can be a little fiddly, so take your time and build each individual model as you go!

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You also get one more spare component which is for you to use in replacement of the Dread Wardens weapon. This single component allows you to add in more models into this unit giving you a unit of 20, or 30, or 40 and so on. Perfect for identify a leader in bigger units. See below the full unit of 10.

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From issue four of Mortal Realms, you get a paint called Nihilakh Oxide which is a technical paint that leaves a sort of blue wash finish over your models. And although this would be a perfect colour for these models, I wanted to have a bit of a stronger pigment colour and went with a Hexwraith Flame wash, to help make these models pop on the table top.

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First step in any painting session no matter the size, is to prime your models with an appropriate basing item. I’m going to use Corax White Base Paint. Two reasons really, 1) I live in a small flat, so using spray cans simply isn’t and option for me & 2) I wanted a white base primer as I intend to use a wash as the main overall colour and I really wanted that stand out on each miniature. Using darker primers means it wouldn’t show as well or, if at all.

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Having covered the unit in a full coverage of base primer, I feel that If I had a bigger hobby space where I could use the spray can version of the Corax White Base Paint, I would be able to have reached those more difficult spaces much more easily and quicker. However, the paint works just as well. Take your time and the end results are the same.

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Once the base primer has fully dried…double check it is! I then applied a single layer of Hexwraith Flame to all of the spirt / ghostly areas of each mini. Leaving all the cloth and weapon areas white for later painting. This stage is fairly straight forward and simple to do as the Hexwraith Flame acts more like a wash over the miniature. Great for speed painters too!

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Not needing much to instantly gain results, make sure you spread this colour in all the areas you’re trying to cover to avoid any pooling and tide marks you can get if letting the paint gather in those deeper areas. Taking a little care to hit all the areas, you should end up with a similar sort of finish as below. Again, this was applied directly out of the pot. Just use it sparingly over all the areas.

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Now the largest areas are complete, time to move onto the second. The cloth. I wanted to keep my army looking overall dark in theme with single spirit areas being bright and green to help bring that contrast in colour whilst showing their ghostly appearance.

To do this, I used Necromancer Cloak. I didn’t want to just go with a total black colour as I felt that may have just dominated the model a bit to much and it also wouldn’t look like black cloth? So this gave me a great starting point for future highlighting and washing. Repeating the process on each model, take time and care when applying coverage! Depending on how thin you apply this, you may need a second coat to get that full rich and smooth coverage.

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Once the cloth areas are fully dry, its time to turn out attention to the third large parts of the model. Any metal areas. Mourn Fang Brown might seem like a strange colour to use here, but it was perfect for what I wanted to achieve.

As Nighthaunt as spirits, to me, having nice new shinny amour just wasn’t the look I was going for, so I opted to go with a more rusty look and hoped this would compliment the bright green area. Being mega careful not to go over anywhere else on the model, slowly apply a single layer of Mourn Fang Brown across all of these areas. See below.

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Retributor Armour – Next part is a small one in comparison. Some, not all of these models have various amounts of locks on the chains, representing locked up prisoners etc. A simple covering of Retributor Armour fits the job perfect. Why gold? Well, I wanted a bright pigment colour to help stand out and pop showing a little added detail. And, because the next step of dry brushing silver over the brown was going to help blend things a little nicer together.

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Ironbreaker
Is what I used for dry brushing all of the metal chains and weapon areas. By “dry brushing” the silver areas over the top of the brown, I was able to create a really simple and what I think, is a pretty effective looking rust colour which really wasn’t too hard to create. As well as that, I haven’t got to the stage of using any washes, which is only going to help blend this even more.

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Agrax Earth Shade – Using this as a wash for the cloth and metal parts of the miniature. This wash is prefect for blending metallic colours and making them more natural which is great for re-creating that dirty, rusty weaponry look I was going for. I also applied this to the cloth areas as well, as I wanted to add depth to the recess before I added the highlights.

I don’t know about you, but this is look pretty sweet so far I think!

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After leaving some time for time for Agrax Earth Shade to completely dry and make sure it is, I then started with some more dry brushing. Dawnstone was perfect for this. I wanted to highlight the black cloth just a little to bring back those very top edge highlights, to help lift things back a touch. Starting incredibly light, I kept repeating the process until I was happy with the overall finish of the model.

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The only thing left to do to finish the painting of the unit was to finish the Dread Warden with his extra little bits and pieces before I could move onto the basing side of things.

Ushabti Bone Gave me such a good colour for the candles against the green, black and rust. I think it worked really well adding a spot of colour. Graph-Hound Orange was then used for the burning flames at the top.



Basing Nighthaunt:
To begin, I simply applied a generous helping of PVA glue to each base and then dropped sand onto the top. I wanted to keep things simple as Nighthaunt are / more then most, can be played as a horde army and having a rather detailed basing theme just wasn’t gonna cut it for me. I wanted to keep things simple and quick and not overly time consuming. Yet something which would give me an overall good finish. Let me explain…

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Skavenblight Dinge
was used to cover the entire base giving me a dead ground environment I was going for. I then very lightly, once it had fully dried, used Dawnstone to help lift and bring back some detail of the gravely base. Which gave me this look. I was pretty happy with this so far. Simple to replicate across a horde army and I think that it worked nicely against the colours on the miniatures?

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Once I was happy with the overall look, I simply applied a covering of Abandon Black over the rims of the bases just to neaten things up a little and make everything look more in keeping with itself. Pretty happy at this point!

All that was left at this point was to chop up a few dead grass tuffs that I had a bunch of lying around and with that, the unit was finished. Alternatively, the Scorched Tuft from Army Painter will equally work so well!

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And here you go! 10 Chainrasps ready for the table top!

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Thanks for reading!

If you like anything you’ve read in this painting guide, I’ve thrown together all the links you need to follow this painting guide step-by-step. Check it out for yourself!

Painting List:
Corax White Base Paint
Hexwraith Flame
Necromancer Cloak
MournFang Brown
Retribution Armour
Ironbreaker
Agrax Earth Shade
Dawnstone
Ushabti Bone
Gryph-Hound Orange
Skavenblight Dinge
Abaddon Black
Scorched Tuft



Element Games - Wargaming Webstore

Element Games - Wargaming Webstore

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